Showing posts with label Revit. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Revit. Show all posts

Revit 2014 Update Release 1

Available since last August an update for Revit 2014 to fix some issues
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Revit: Changing Family Type

How to change a family type? Easy and simple.
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Revit: Calculating and Scheduling Gross Wall Area

Revit wall area is incorrect if you want it including the openings area. This add in allows you to get the gross area (including openings) correct.
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Revit: Rotating the Section Box

You can actually rotate Section boxes in Revit to cut the model in a non perpendicular angle. How to do it is simple
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New IFC Exporters for Revit Available for Download

New IFC exporters for Revit available

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Revit 2014 Books

Revit 2014 Books are now available
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Revit 2014 Download Links

Revit 2014 is finally available for download
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What's new and enhanced in Revit 2014

Introduction to the new features of Revit 2014
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Book Review: Instant Autodesk Revit 2013 Customization with .NET How-to

A brief review on this book that introduces you to .NET programming to create Revit Add-ins
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Autodesk seems to [not?] like people promoting Revit

Audoesk seems to be suing Revitforum. Don't they have any sense of bad online campaings?

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Free Revit Family Manager Add-in

A new add-in to manage your families in revit. And it is free.
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Revit Interference Check

Check for interfering / clashing elements in your model directly in Revit.
Català - Castellano - Deutsch
Revit has a functionality to check for elements that are interfering with each other. This might be used to check interferences when collaborating between consultants (Architect, MEP Engineer, Structural Engineer, etc) or simply to check that the model you build has no interferences that could cause unwanted results. The functionality, of course is called "interference check".

To run it, simply go to the Collaborate Tab --> Coordination Panel --> Interference Check --> Run Interference Check.


You should be now at the interference check interface, where you can select the elements you want to use to check interferences. Select a type or types of elements on the left and another type or types on the right and click OK.



If there are interferences (i.e. those elements collide with each other) you will get a report listing those interferences like the one I am showing below.


Having this report, you can either select an object and click on Show to see the object, or you can also export the report to have a reference list of potential things to be solved / modified in the model. An exported report (HTML) looks like this.



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Revit: Customize the Display Order of Ribbon Tabs

It is possible (and quite simple) to customize the order in which Revit Ribbon Tabs appear.
Català - Castellano - Deutsch
I always wondered why the hell the Modify tab on the ribbon is at the far right. Always thought it would be better to have it right near the "home" Tab. Well it is actually possible and quite simple.


Simply press control and click and drag on the name of the tab you want to move. That simple!

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Revit: Walkthrough Examples

A video with some sample walkthroughs done in Revit.
Català - Castellano
This is a short promotional video we created to share with clients and partners some of the projects we've been working on in 2011. All are projects were BIM had a role, either as an experimentation exercise or truly as the tool to check for design inconsistencies or even later on as the basis of a quantity take-off and estimation.

I've been managing and modeling all these models, so well, a little self promotion isn't bad once in a while right? In a later post I will explain briefly how to create a walkthrough in Revit and a few tricks that might help on creating a video like the one below. Turn down the speakers bit, I think we got a bit too excited with the Music ;-P. Enjoy!



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Revit: Transfer Materials, Families, Symbols from one Project to Another

Revit allows to transfer information from one project to another. No need to copy and paste.
Català - Castellano - Deutsch
If you need to use certain information from a project in another (family types, annotation symbols, building types, materials...) you can do so by simply going to the Manage Tab of the Ribbon, and then choosing the "Transfer Project Standards" button (see below).


Once you've clicked this you will get the menu where you can choose which element do you really want to import and from which project (in case you have ore than one project open). you need to have both projects open, the one you want import from and the one you want to import to. The operation must be done being on a view of the project you want to import to.


It is no doubt a much better way than copying and pasting elements. Ideally, you want to have a very thorough template so you don't need to do this, but sometimes, to create this template (at least your first Revit template) you might want to use this process to import families, and other standards to it from projects you worked on to later polish them in the template file.

Hope this helps

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Case Study: The use of Revit MEP by JG ingenieros

JG Ingenieros will explain its experience with the implementation and use of Revit MEP on an online webinar organised by A3D consulting.
Català - Castellano - Deutsch
JG Engineers is one of the leading engineering companies in the Spanish market and has a strong international presence. In recent months, JG has been implementing Revit MEP.

On Friday October 7, 2011, A3D Consulting has invited them to explain their experiences with this software. An online webinar very interesting for all those interested in Revit, BIM in general and Revit MEP and how and what is being done in Spain on these subjects.

To access the webinar you need to register through A3D Consulting. (The webinar will be held in Spanish).




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Importing Google Earth Topography to AutoCAD and then to Revit

Step by step on how to turn a Google Earth terrain into Revit Topography.
Català - Castellano - Deutsch
Was recently trying to import a Google Earth Terrain into a Revit Project to show an overall view of it. Since I did the research on how to do it, I will share it here.

I will basically list the 20 steps (15 for AutoCAD users) with a brief explanation if necessary, I think that's enough to follow the precess. You might not need to do some of the first steps, but the guide is intended for everyone who doesn't even know about Autodesk Labs. So here it comes:
  1. Be sure you have A compatible version of AutoCAD (2007 or newer in 32bit 2011 or 2012 in 64bit). Be sure you have A compatible version of Google Earth (5.x or 6.x) if you don't download it here
  2. Register on Autodesk Labs
  3. Sign In to your Account at Autodesk Labs
  4. Download the Google Earth Extension for AutoCAD based Products here
  5. Save PublishDWGtoGE.zip to your computer.
  6. Unzip the PublishDWGtoGE.zip file.
  7. Browse the PublishDWGtoGE folder that comes from the .ZIP file and find your AutoCAD version installer (first the year and then the 32 or 64 bit option)
  8. Run the installer (extension .msi)
  9. Open AutoCAD and Google Earth and check that in AutoCAD any of this commands works:IMPORTGEIMAGE, IMPORTGEMESH, GETIME, PUBLISHKML
  10. If they work, follow to step 15, if they don't do the follwoing steps
  11. Check the AutoCAD folder to see if the file named AeccDWGToGE.arx is there (it should), if it doesn't repeat the installation in case something went wrong, otherwise keep reading
  12. Run the ARX command in AutoCAD and enter L for Load when it prompts for an option in the command line bar.
  13. Browse to your AutoCAD folder and load the AeccDWGToGE.arx file
  14. Center your Google Earth view to the terrain portion you want to import
  15. Now run IMPORTGEMESH in AutoCAD (you must have Google Earth running)and the terrain will be imported to AutoCAD from Google Earth. If you are an AutoCAD user you are done, if Revit user keep reading
  16. Save the AutoCAD file (you can close Google Earth and AutoCAD after this)
  17. Open Revit
  18. Go to Insert Tab on the Ribbon and select Link CAD (or Ipmort CAD doesn't seem to matter here) and browse to find the Topography file you saved from AutoCAD.
  19. Now and finally go to Massing and Site Tab on the Ribbon and select Topo Surface
  20. Click on "Create from Import" and click on the imported topography from AutoCAD
Might seem complicated but it is actually not.



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Revit Bugs: Things that Revit Stairs don't do right #01

Every day I try to use Revit for Construction I see more and more how it has been completely thought mostly for design. Is that really BIM?
Català - Castellano - Deutsch
I still consider myself pretty new using Revit (less than 2 years experience and only 4 and a half projects), so when I am writing a post complaining about some of the things that do not work properly I try to check twice that they really don't work. If what I say is wrong, and you know the way to do it, please share here.

As far as I have managed to play with stairs, they are one of the family types lacking the most needed functionality. Since I am using revit for trying to get estimates, in my case the main functions that do not work properly are the following.

Area calculations for Stairs and their materials: to be able to get estimates of the costs of monolitic stairs (the most common one made of a concrete structure plus a paving materia for risers and threads) we need to be able to calculate the area of concrete that the stair has, and the area of paving materials.

Using the area of the concrete slab of the stair and landings as a unit might be a local thing, but this is how we do it here, so obtaining cubic meters of concrete slab is not what we need. I haven't found a way to obtain that, so stairs are one of the things I need to measure manually still when obtaining quatities from a Revit Model. I know I could paint the lower part of the stair with a different material, but I would rather have Revit handle Information better than that if it can. And my question at this point is Can it? If it can, please do let me know.

Second point on the list. Stairs have pavement material for threads and landings and another (or the same) material for risers. Although I can calculate riser and thread material surface by using the Width, Minimum Thread Depth and Actual Riser Height values to make some calculations, this is not good enough for landings would not be counted properly. I tried to obtain the materials from a Material Take Off Schedule, and relized Revit counts that wrong. Let me show you how wrong. Imagine a Stair that has 20 steps 0.28m deep and 1 meter wide. The easy calculations Depth x Width x Number of Threads gives us the Paving Area of the Threads. 19 x 0.28m x 1m = 5.32m2. Now lets see how Revit does calculatin this right? See the image below.


Surprise, Revit is giving me for that stair a Thread Material Area of 10.69m2, slightly more than double what it should give. What happens with Risers? The same my friend. 20 risers x 0.175 m (riser height) x 1 m (width) = 3.5 m2. As you see on the image the are that Revit counts ii twice that plus a bit more.

After playing with it a bit I realized Revit is giving the Area as the addition of the 6 faces of each thread or riser, so it is counting the area it should twice, plus adding the 4 side faces of risers and threads. Just wrong and useless.

Another thing stairs are lacking is the capacity to behave like floors (when monolitic, that is what they are). This is needed so they can enclose rooms and walls can get attached to them, right now as far as I know this can't be done, so it needs improvements.

Anyone thinks I am asking impossibles or knows of a way of doing all this that I am missing?



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